The Two-Faced-Book

The recent revelations of Facebook’s data breach have shed light on quite how much personal information Facebook has collected and the means to which it is put to use. In response, a global ‘shock and awe’ has led to Mark Zuckerberg questioned by the US Senate, the ‘DeleteFacebook’ movement and a consensus that Facebook has committed a great wrong.

In this blog post, I argue that we should share in this blame, we built a society which champions profit over purpose, where privacy is worth less than pennies and Facebook is entrusted (without reason) to act like a Government. However, within this capitalist society, we also have the tools to make the change we desire and this loss of privacy can bring about a greater good. Continue reading The Two-Faced-Book

‘I Found Myself Travelling’

 

We all know of someone who has declared ‘I found myself travelling’. Not only are they trotting out a cliché but they also seem deluded that one needs to spend thousands of pounds to fly to another country, introduce yourself hundreds of times and buy a ‘local beer-shirt’ before you can confirm your location. We often see these platitudes as bullshit; this is parodied in this ‘Gap Yah’ clip.

gap yah.jpg
I saw this woman with Malaria…and then I chundered EVERYWHERE!

But, are they? Bullshit, I mean…? Some are but I argue there is a form of travel which brings one into the unknown and from that, one can indeed ‘find [a bit more of] yourself’. I substantiate how and why. Continue reading ‘I Found Myself Travelling’

Thou shalt not take Atheism’s name in vain

Did you know Buddhists can be Atheists? In fact, an Atheist can even be religious, support religion and be Agnostic!

The term Atheist has lost its true meaning, has become synonymous with an aggressive anti-religious stance, and is now considered an irrationally strong conviction. I wish to reclaim it. Worry not – this is not a post advocating for atheism! Continue reading Thou shalt not take Atheism’s name in vain

What we can learn from Lincoln’s Leadership

Yes, this is another post on Lincoln, following What the Left can Learn from Lincoln, but as someone who led a government to win the US Civil War, implement the first US income tax, became the first Republican President and abolished slavery, he knew a thing or two about leading old white men – an essential skill in Western politics.

In this post, I delve into two unique features of his leadership: 1) a desire for a legacy, rather than fame or fortune and 2) an ambition with magnanimity, rather than ego. Continue reading What we can learn from Lincoln’s Leadership

What the Left can Learn from Lincoln

Blog Update

I am hoping to shorten the length of my posts, in response to useful reader advice, and post more regularly, ideally once a week. I find my own, hopefully interesting, ideas are very time consuming to write up (8-10 hours a post) so to make this rate feasible, I will draw inspiration from the work of others. Fortunately, this will not require researching further as I have made it a (painful) habit since the age of 16 to ritually take notes on ANY content I have learnt from – fiction & non-fiction books, podcasts, events & talks, observations at work, and even insightful discussions. I will try to collate them in thought-provoking and hopefully novel ways, let me know what you think!

Who was Lincoln?

Abraham Lincoln is a household name, and much like most household names, people are content with the name to be the extent of their knowledge. Continue reading What the Left can Learn from Lincoln

Trying to Define Happiness

This post builds on my recent blog, Confessions of an Addict, which discusses our societal addiction to happiness, how it is misguided and has consequences for all. In that post, as a friend highlighted, I failed to define happiness. Here, I attempt to address that oversight by considering two conceptions of happiness, discussing their implications and how society’s actions show that ‘Happiness = Pleasure’ dominates. Continue reading Trying to Define Happiness